Nov. 30, 2019

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Fleck is a Clojure-like LISP that runs wherever Bash is. Get it here.

This is a little experiment I hacked together from the amazing make-a-lisp project. My hard drive is littered with attempts to make this exact thing several times, and this was the first time I got it working properly.

My friend Crispin reminded me of this idea when we were discussing lightweight Clojure based scripting tools for domain specific tasks. He has made a fantastic Clojure static site generator called bootleg on top of GraalVM. We've both been inspired by the work of Michiel Borkent such as Small Clojure Intepereter and Babashka.

For more Clojure-likes check out awesome-clojure-likes.

Exciting times in the Clojure-verse!

Nov. 21, 2019

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Last week I was in Singapore with my friends PVI Collective, consulting with local artists Ekamatra and Drama Box. We were hacking on eachother's artworks in their studio loft above Chinatown. Locative code, smart watches and dark LARP-arts - it was like I'd stepped into a post-cyberpunk William Gibson novel somehow.

I also gave a talk at the Singapore JS meetup on Bugout, the library I wrote to help build decentralized web applications. You can watch the talk here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfPX-dR6LeM

This trip gave me the headspace to think about priorities and progress on my side projects. At the moment I'm focused on two main things apart from paid work.

Firstly, I'm working towards the launch of the paid version of SVG Flipbook, an SVG animation utility for people using Inkscape and Illustrator. Hopefully this will be ready for launch in the next couple of weeks. This is a project I started a while ago and I'm coming back to now.

Secondly, I had some time to think about and work on WebRTC Signaling Mesh, which is coming along nicely. It will be a way to do WebRTC signaling without resorting to centralized services. I've had the design floating around my head for a long time and I've finally begun implementation. Will hopefully have an update with progress on that soon.

Thanks for tuning in!

Nov. 5, 2019

A few weeks ago at the BSides Perth conference I announced this piece of hardware I've been tinkering on.

The Bugout Box is a decentralized web appliance. Its a Raspberry Pi that any browser can connect to from anywhere in the world over WebRTC - a censorship-resistant way to serve data, APIs and apps.

Examples of things you can do with the box:

Bugout Box 3d view

Head to bugout.network/box if you want to find out more and sign up to the pre-release list.

Sept. 30, 2019

An economist told me the worst part of her job is turning Excel data into HTML tables, so I built an add-in to fix it.

Many software developers probably don't realise that Microsoft Office add-ins these days are simply web pages which run inside of a panel in the UI. I suppose it was to be expected given the trend of the last couple of decades towards web based everything, but it still came as a surprise to me when I had to build one for a job. In my mind Office was still back in the world of COM objects and Delphi and DLLs.

After discovering how easy it is, I decided to do it again for this side project. Here is how I did it.

The plugin (whoops, "add-in") I built is called "Excel to HTML table" and does what it says on the tin. You make a selection of cells, click "copy", and you get a clipboard full of the corresponding HTML code that will render those cells. After that you can paste the code into your text editor and use it in a site's HTML.

Excel to HTML table screencast

Microsoft have some nodejs and yeoman projects to help you get up and running but I'm the sort of developer who likes to roll their own and keep things tight, tidy, and tiny. I like to build things from first principles so that I can understand what is going on at as low a level as possible. Here's what I discovered.

The Microsoft Tutorial has a lot of good info in it, but it's geared towards people using either Node + Yeoman or Visual Studio. If you're a text-editor-and-command-line person like me the best way to get started is just to grab the example .html, .css, and .js snippets from the Visual Studio version.

Get a dev server running

Any local HTTPS server will do. The difficult part is it must be HTTPS, even on localhost, or Word/Excel will refuse to load your add-in. My add-in is almost entirely client-side code and so I could get away with a small Python server using the built-in libraries like this:

from http.server import HTTPServer,SimpleHTTPRequestHandler httpd = HTTPServer(address, SimpleHTTPRequestHandler) httpd.socket = ssl.wrap_socket(httpd.socket, keyfile='selfsigned.key', certfile='selfsigned.cer', server_side=True) httpd.serve_forever()

As you can see this looks for the .key and .cer files in the local dir, and you can create those with openssl:

openssl req -x509 -newkey rsa:4096 -keyout selfsigned.key -out selfsigned.cer -days 365 -nodes -subj "/C=US/ST=NY/O=localhost/OU=Localhost"

You can do the same thing in nodejs with express if that's your bag by passing the right options to https.createServer:

const server = https.createServer({ key: fs.readFileSync('./selfsigned.key'), cert: fs.readFileSync('./selfsigned.pem') }, app).listen(8000)

Before you can load your add-in you should make sure your browser has accepted the self-signed cert or the add-in won't load. Do this by browsing to your localhost:8000 server and bypassing the certificate warnings.

If you're debugging in the native Office app instead of Office Online, you will need to do this in Internet Explorer for it to work as far as I can tell.

Manifest validation

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Office finds out about the URL for your add-in using a "manifest" file. This file is XML and pretty fragile. You need to make sure it complies with the spec. Luckily Microsoft have a tool for verifying the add-in on the command line. Install the npm package "office-toolbox": "0.2.1" and then you can run a command like this:

./node_modules/.bin/office-toolbox validate -m ./path/to/manifest.xml

This will report most issues that come up.

In the manifest you can use https://localhost:8000/Home.html and it will point to your local dev server when running.

The Code

The code itself is basically web code. You can use libraries like React and jQuery in your UI. The exception of course is when calling the native APIs. These are exposed through an interface like Excel.run(...) and make heavy use of promises for async. You will often find yourself doing context.load() and then waiting for the promise to resolve before doing the next thing in the document. The API documentation is super useful for figuring out what is possible and how to do it.

Debugging

When it comes to iterating on your code and debugging, by far the easiest way is to use Office Online. This is because it is already in the web browser so debugging works the same way as you are used to - the add-in is just an iframe.

I was even able to do my dev & debugging right at home in Firefox on GNU/Linux!

At some point you will want to debug using an actual copy of Office running on Windows. I used Office 2016 on my wife's computer.

If you are not a Windows developer the following tip will save you a lot of time when it comes to debugging native. It's called "F12 Developer Tools" and it's buried deep inside a Windows subdirectory in C:\Windows\System32\F12\.

What this tool does is attach a "web console" type of debugger to your Office add-in instance running inside Office. You can do stuff like console.log and also see JavaScript errors which are thrown.

Ready to roll

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Once you've got those pieces in place you should have a basic add-in up and running. After that it's all about referencing the docs to figure out how to do the thing you want your add-in to do.

Submit

Finally when you're ready to ship, you submit your manifest.xml to the App Source "seller dashboard". Expect to wait a few days for the validation team to get back to you, and to have to fix things. This process was useful as they see the software with a fresh pair of eyes and give actionable feedback.

LISP madness

So finally I should mention my LISP obsession. I actually wrote all the code for this plugin in a LISP called Wisp. It's a Clojure-like that compiles to JavaScript and seems quite similar to ClojureScript but with three core differences:

  1. It lacks almost all of the great features & tooling of ClojureScript.
  2. It is closer to being "JavaScript with LISP syntax".
  3. It compiles down very small if you know what you are doing. How small? My final compiled .js bundle for this add-in is just 8.2k non-gzipped.

So that's about it. I hope you got something out of this article on building Microsoft Office plugins using web tech.

Now back to open source dev for me. :)

Sept. 26, 2019

Hy(lang) is a LISP-family programming language built on top of Python. You get the rich Python language & library ecosystem, with a LISP syntax and many of the language conveniences of Clojure, such as reader macros for easy access to built in data types. What's not to love?

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I recently found out I have the most GitHub stars for projects written in Hy of any developer worldwide. With this admittedly ridiculous credential in hand I'd like to offer some opinions on the language.

I really like Hy a lot. I prefer writing code in Hy to writing code in Python, and I am writing this post because I want to see Hy do well. I originally wrote this as a list of things in Hy that could possibly be improved, from the perspective of an end user such as myself. Then my friend Crispin sent me this fantastic video by Adam Harvey: "What PHP learned from Python" and I realised that all of the issues I have with Hy stem from the same basic problem that Adam talks about.

Here is the crux of the problem: I've written a bunch of software in Hy over the past few years and often when I moved to a newer point-release of the language all my old code breaks. My hard drive is littered with projects which only run under a specific sub-version of Hy.

gilch[m] It might depend on the Hy version you're using.

I understand that the maintainers of the language, who are hard-working people doing a public service for which I'm deeply grateful, are concerned with making the language pure and clean and good. I understand that languages have to change to get better and they need to "move fast and break things" sometimes. That's all fine and good.

However, I think Adam Harvey's point stands. If you want users to use and love your language:

  • Break things cautiously
  • Maintain terrible things if it makes life better
  • Expand the zone of overlap [backwards compatibility between consecutive versions]

I think if you can maintain backwards compatability you should.

Almost all of the breakages I've experienced between Hy versions could have been avoided with aliasing and documentation. Not doing this backwards compatibility work basically tells your users "don't build things with this language, we don't care about you." I know that is almost certainly not the attitude of the maintainers (who are lovely, helpful people in my experience) but it is the way it comes across as an end user.

Here is a list of things which have changed between versions which blew up my Hy codebases each time I upgraded Hy:

  • Renaming true, false, and nil to the Python natives True, False, and None. These could have been aliased to maintain backwards compabitility.

  • Removing list-comp and dict-comp in favour of the excellent lfor, dfor, and friends. Again, small macros could have aliased the old versions to the new versions.

  • Removing def in favour of setv. A very small macro or maybe even an alias could have retained def as it is pretty much functionally identical from the perspective of an end user.

  • Removing apply, presumably in favour of #**. Support could have been retained for the functional apply. There are situations where a proper apply is favourable.

  • Removing the core macro let. It seems there was an issue where let would not behave correctly with generators and Python's yield statement. A more user-friendly solution than chopping the imperfect let from the default namespace and breaking everybody's code would have been to document the issue clearly for users and leave the imperfect let in. I know it is available in contrib. Moving it to contrib broke codebases.

Having your old code break each time you use a new version is frustrating. It makes it hard to justify using the language for new projects because the maintainance burden will be hy-er (sorry heh).

Some other minor nits I should mention which I think would vastly improve the language:

  • loop/recur should be core. Like let these are available in contrib, but that means you have to explicitly import them. Additionally it would be super nice if they were updated to support the vector-of-pairs declaration style of let and cond etc.

  • Why does assoc return None? This is completely unexpected. If there are performance issues then create an alternative which does what Python dict assignment does (aset?) but it seems unwise to break user expectations so fundamentally.

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It is much easier to provide criticism than it is to write working code. I am sorry this is a blog post instead of a pull request, and I hope this criticism is seen as constructive. I want to thank everybody who has worked on hy. I am a huge fan of the language. It is an amazing piece of software and I am very grateful for your work.

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