Jan. 22, 2020

Last week I was on the Gold Coast for Linux Conf AU. I gave two talks:

Piku: git push deployments to your own servers

px3d: a free software browser based pixel 3D nano-engine in ClojureScript

Other talks

I've compiled a list of talks I got a lot of value from which you can find on Twitter.

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Enjoy!

Jan. 8, 2020

Photographs are easy to fake. So much so that there is a turn of phrase to describe it. People say something is "'shopped" when they are skeptical regarding the veracity of an image. This refers to the image editing program Photoshop which is often used to modify images. For example the magazine industry routinely modifies the photographs which appear in their pages.

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Recorded audio is even easier to fake.

In recent years we're discovering that even video, with its high information bandwidth, is easy to fake via carefully trained neural networks.

Seth Godin notes that anybody now has the ability to generate photos of completely fake people:

it's worth confirming the source before you believe what you see

-- Seth Godin

Where does this leave us? How do we reliably confirm the source? Physical reality prevents us from receiving most information first-hand. If most information that is not first-hand can be faked how can we ensure authenticity?

Cryptographic signatures will save us

The answer is good old cryptography.

One way to authenticate media with a high degree of certainty is to have it cryptographically signed. This provides a level of reputational consistency. If a president signs every speech they make with a certain cryptographic key then you have a way to check that the president who gave the first speech very likely is the same president gave the latest one.

Much more so than relying on indications of fakeness from the item of media itself. Additionally, the slightest alteration of the media will render the signature invalid and everybody will be able to see that it has been tampered with.

How far away are we from public figures cryptographically signing their statements? From people's phones signing the photographs they take? From organisations routinely signing blog posts, tweets, and everything they output into the world?

Dec. 31, 2019

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Nov. 30, 2019

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Fleck is a Clojure-like LISP that runs wherever Bash is. Get it here.

This is a little experiment I hacked together from the amazing make-a-lisp project. My hard drive is littered with attempts to make this exact thing several times, and this was the first time I got it working properly.

My friend Crispin reminded me of this idea when we were discussing lightweight Clojure based scripting tools for domain specific tasks. He has made a fantastic Clojure static site generator called bootleg on top of GraalVM. We've both been inspired by the work of Michiel Borkent such as Small Clojure Intepereter and Babashka.

For more Clojure-likes check out awesome-clojure-likes.

Exciting times in the Clojure-verse!

Nov. 21, 2019

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Last week I was in Singapore with my friends PVI Collective, consulting with local artists Ekamatra and Drama Box. We were hacking on eachother's artworks in their studio loft above Chinatown. Locative code, smart watches and dark LARP-arts - it was like I'd stepped into a post-cyberpunk William Gibson novel somehow.

I also gave a talk at the Singapore JS meetup on Bugout, the library I wrote to help build decentralized web applications. You can watch the talk here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfPX-dR6LeM

This trip gave me the headspace to think about priorities and progress on my side projects. At the moment I'm focused on two main things apart from paid work.

Firstly, I'm working towards the launch of the paid version of SVG Flipbook, an SVG animation utility for people using Inkscape and Illustrator. Hopefully this will be ready for launch in the next couple of weeks. This is a project I started a while ago and I'm coming back to now.

Secondly, I had some time to think about and work on WebRTC Signaling Mesh, which is coming along nicely. It will be a way to do WebRTC signaling without resorting to centralized services. I've had the design floating around my head for a long time and I've finally begun implementation. Will hopefully have an update with progress on that soon.

Thanks for tuning in!

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